IN THIS SECTION:
THE LAND
Location
Climate
Topography
Geology
Flora
Fauna
 

 
OTHER LINKS
YOU ARE HERE : THE NATION > THE LAND > CLIMATE

Click to preview the Video Clip
 

click to listen to voice over Click to listen the narration


Welcome to the sunny part of the world!

Malaysia is blessed with perpetual sunshine. Lying entirely in the equatorial zone, its climate is governed by the seasonal North-East and South-West monsoons. Of the two, the south-west monsoon which cycle from mid-November till March serves as a drier period for Malaysia, particularly for the west coast of the Peninsula as it is sheltered by the land mass of Sumatra. During the North-East monsoon, from May to September, the sky turns grey, the landscape is drenched and the rivers become swollen.


A dense bamboo thicket in the Malaysian heartland.

The transitional period between the two monsoons is marked by heavy rainfall, accompanied by lightning and thunderstorms.

Malaysia's share of annual rainfall of about 260 centimetres is above the global average. Sarawak records the most rainfall in the country, receiving between 350 to 500 centimetres annually. Basically, there are three main types of rainfall: convectional, orographic and cyclonic, the first being the most prominent.

Daytime temperatures in the lowlands average 32 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit) with high humidity levels of 80 per cent on most days. However, for every 100 metres increase in altitude, the temperature drops by about 0.6 degrees Celsius. The only place where freezing point is experienced is at the peak of Sabah's Mount Kinabalu, the highest mountain in Southeast Asia.

top Back to top

 Updated :